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Rain Gardens

Rain Gardens

What is a Rain Garden? A Rain Garden is a planted depression into which rainwater drains from impervious urban areas, like roofs, driveways, and compacted lawns. In its simplest form, a rain garden is a shallow depression, containing absorbent, yet free draining soil and planted with vegetation that can withstand occasional temporary flooding. Rain gardens are designed to mimic the natural water retention of undeveloped land, and are more efficient than garden lawns in absorbing excess water drained from hard surfaces.

 Excess rain water drains firstly into what is essentially a flower bed, and continues to drain slowly into the surrounding soil instead of flowing into the drainage system. They can be designed for specific soils and climates.

 The Rain Gardens also dispose of excess water through transpiration. This is the process where a plant takes up water through its roots, and finally returns water to the atmosphere by evaporation from its leaves.

 Native, water tolerant plants are recommended for rain gardens because they are more tolerant of the local climate, soil, and water conditions. Biodiversity gains enormously because Rain Gardens also attract wildlife.

 A Rain Garden Guide has been produced by leading experts in the field of water management, and is supported by both the Environment Agency and Southern Water. The guide introduces you to Rain Gardens and talks about why and where you might like to create your own. A whole garden can become a rain garden, and each component of the whole can become a small-scale rain garden in itself.

 Follow this link to download the Rain Garden Guide

Follow this link to find out more about Rain Gardens

Environment

Environment

The Manhood Peninsula Partnership was formed in recognition of the challenges the peninsula faces as a result of climate change and the increasing demands on its environment. By recognising the different issues the area faces, its assets and possibilities, and by valuing its distinct and almost unique character on the south coast, the MPP hopes to create opportunities and... Read More»

Drainage & Flood Risk

Drainage & Flood Risk

Drainage and flood risk are increasing problems on the Manhood Peninsula which may worsen considerably with climate change. For local advice see the Chichester District Council web pages for Drainage - Help and Advice. The Manhood Peninsula Partnership (MPP) commissioned a drainage survey of the peninsula and is working closely with local parishes to improve drainage knowledge of the area and help local authorities... Read More»

Maritime History

Maritime History

For most of its history, Sussex has been an agricultural county. The Chichester area, with the fertile coastal plain for arable and the Downs for sheep and cattle grazing, has long been one of the richest in agricultural terms. Just as the medieval sea trades were based on wool, Chichester Harbour’s sea trade from the 17th to the early... Read More»