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Local Nature Partnerships

Local Nature Partnerships

Local Nature Partnerships (LNPs) are partnerships of a broad range of local organisations, businesses and people who aim to help bring about improvements in their local natural environment.

LNPs work  strategically to help their local area manage the natural environment. They aim to make sure that its value, and the value of the services it provides to the economy and the people who live there, is taken into account in local decisions, for example about planning and development.

Setting up LNPs was one of the commitments the UK government made in the Natural Environment White Paper 2011. The approach derived from this can be found in the government policy paper 2015 - 2015 government policy: biodiversity and ecosystems.

The map and contact information for Local Nature Partnerships was updated in July 2016 and can be found by following this link: Local Nature Partnerships map and contact information 2016.

 

Environment

Environment

The Manhood Peninsula Partnership was formed in recognition of the challenges the peninsula faces as a result of climate change and the increasing demands on its environment. By recognising the different issues the area faces, its assets and possibilities, and by valuing its distinct and almost unique character on the south coast, the MPP hopes to create opportunities and... Read More»

Agriculture and Horticulture

Agriculture and Horticulture

Agricultural land on the manhood is mainly Grade I and Grade II, among the best arable land in the country. Farms in the area have an average size of about 625 acres. The National Farmers Union estimates that an arable farm needs to be about 400 acres or more to be profitable. However, increasing drainage problems is resulting in... Read More»

Coastal Management

Coastal Management

A large part of the Manhood Peninsula is less than 5m above sea level and at risk from flooding, both inland and coastal. It is likely that climate change will increase this risk, through rising sea levels, rising water tables and increased precipitation intensity. Drainage is an increasing problem on the peninsula as the existing ditches are proving inadequate... Read More»